Africa: International Criminal Court Faces Funding Crisis

| October 7, 2012 | 0 Comments

The International Criminal Court (ICC) has admitted that the court is facing serious funding challenges which have politically affected the operations of the court.

During a four day International Justice Conference that started on Tuesday in Nuremberg, Germany, ICC President Judge Sang-Hyung Song complained that the under funding challenges have also affected the court’s independence, which should solely be controlled by the Rome Statute.

Citing Sudan’s referral by the UN Security Council, Song said it was also important for the court to redefine its boundaries with such partners to ensure the court doesn’t raise any questions especially when dealing with countries that are not members of the court.

The President also expressed concerns over non cooperation by member states especially in making arrests where warrants have been issued and also freezing assets as requested by the court.

He used the opportunity to urge the United States, India, China, Russia and Indonesia to become members of the court to strengthen its work of looking for justice where member countries have failed to do so.

He further pointed that the court was also grappling with managing high expectations especially to the victims of situations before the ICC.

Judge Hans Peter Kaul commonly identified as the dissenting judge in the Kenyan cases was recognised for his committed role in international justice especially during the 1990s when the ICC was established.

The President also expressed concerns over non cooperation by member states especially in making arrests where warrants have been issued and also freezing assets as requested by the court.

The conference organised by Wayamo Communication Foundation and Academy of Nuremberg Principles hosted the conference under the theme through the Lens of Nuremberg to discuss the progress of the court in its tenth anniversary.

Kenya’s Attorney General Githu Muigai was among the speakers, who included among others ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda.

Kenya became a subject of the ICC when the court moved to investigate the 2008 post election violence. Four Kenyans – William Ruto, Joshua arap Sang, Amb. Francis Muthaura and Uhuru Kenyatta are expected to begin their trials at the Hague based court in April next year.

They are accused of crimes against humanity following the deaths of over 1,000 people and displacement of about 650,000 others.

Culled from :Here

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Category: Africa News